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"You can tell that in a way it’s a piece for voice. You can hear the voice in it…I think that’s true of good writing in general. Because what is writing? What is writing in a book? What is a page? A page is essentially a score, like a musical score, it’s a score for voice. So it’s either your voice as the reader, when you’re reading it, or sometimes we read them out loud. But when you do read them out loud, you can see they’re constructed, by the writer, for voice".
Margaret Atwood [on Mavis Gallant’s ‘Voices Lost in Snow’]

(Source: newyorker.com)

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"Paul Cézanne spent a lifetime trying to paint around the skin edge of an apple, but in doing so, also catalogued meticulous interest in weight, form and density. His images are unashamedly and knottily visceral. In our current world of retinal impatience, simulacra are everything. Within the digital, there is mechanized instinct so the physicality or surface frictions of images are confused: we must apply our own emotions, assert temperatures and navigate momentums. Information is delivered at breakneck speed (we should wear a helmet!) but it is always contained within the same plane of focus. So there is something spooky about the idea of a dislocated, real-life hand tracing around untouchable matter in order to generate content. We spend many thousands of hours poring over images, investing speculative thought or shunting observation to more disinterested peripheries. So perhaps desperation lies in continually trying to claw around the edges, to peep behind the screen and see the entrails."

"Paul Cézanne spent a lifetime trying to paint around the skin edge of an apple, but in doing so, also catalogued meticulous interest in weight, form and density. His images are unashamedly and knottily visceral. In our current world of retinal impatience, simulacra are everything. Within the digital, there is mechanized instinct so the physicality or surface frictions of images are confused: we must apply our own emotions, assert temperatures and navigate momentums. Information is delivered at breakneck speed (we should wear a helmet!) but it is always contained within the same plane of focus. So there is something spooky about the idea of a dislocated, real-life hand tracing around untouchable matter in order to generate content. We spend many thousands of hours poring over images, investing speculative thought or shunting observation to more disinterested peripheries. So perhaps desperation lies in continually trying to claw around the edges, to peep behind the screen and see the entrails."

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Emmanuelle Riva

Emmanuelle Riva

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Nice article in The Guardian on the ‘meet cute’: “The ‘meet cute’ is Hollywood screenwriters’ name for a standard plot device in which a couple meet in a way that’s charming, ironic, or just generally amusing.

Fractious awkwardness, nervous laughs, bumbling words, chronic faux-pas, “what a jerk!”. I love this one, an all time fave. Who wouldn’t want to get a lift with Diane Keaton. 

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Lesley Gore, ‘You Don’t Own Me”, bristling with attitude. 

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In hindsight, we discover she is not simply a French writer and that, though her writing may call for the plural (“our”), it is not the plural of a community - it is not the “we” of the Burgundians, or people of native French stock, or citizens of the interwar period, or anything else. It is a “we” that is au courant about the pure and the impure, a “we” of transfusion of contagion, of feeling/felt: a paradoxical space of “chiasmus”, explains Merleau-Ponty, an interface of inside and outside, subject and object, a polytopy of decanting and communion beyond the fractures, the cruelty, the war between the sexes and the isolation of different species. It is a certain way of being outside oneself, of expressing a disseminated, disidentified, in-human self, a self au courant about the world’s flesh. It is a way of being in love, obviously, but in Colette’s pure and impure sense; she is au courant about every kind of love and fixes on none.

'Love Expesses Itself Only In Metaphors…'

Colette - Julia Kristeva

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'Love has many guises'

A recent article by The Guardian asked ‘experts in fields from science to fiction’ to respond to the question ‘What is love?’ The pyschotherapist Phillipa Perry offered an sideways perspective on the subject, looking back to the mercurial emotions of the ancients who manipulated the inflexible, singularity of language to instead come up with a variety of terms and definitions.  

Unlike us, the ancients did not lump all the various emotions that we label “love” under the one word. They had several variations, including:

Philia which they saw as a deep but usually non-sexual intimacy between close friends and family members or as a deep bond forged by soldiers as they fought alongside each other in battle. Ludus describes a more playful affection found in fooling around or flirting. Pragma is the mature love that develops over a long period of time between long-term couples and involves actively practising goodwill, commitment, compromise and understanding. Agape is a more generalised love, it’s not about exclusivity but about love for all of humanity. Philautia is self love, which isn’t as selfish as it sounds. As Aristotle discovered and as any psychotherapist will tell you, in order to care for others you need to be able to care about yourself. Last, and probably least even though it causes the most trouble, eros is about sexual passion and desire. Unless it morphs into philia and/or pragma, eros will burn itself out.

Love is all of the above. But is it possibly unrealistic to expect to experience all six types with only one person. This is why family and community are important.”

• Philippa Perry is a psychotherapist and author of Couch Fiction

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 5 notes.
In hindsight, we discover she is not simply a French writer and that, though her writing may call for the plural (“our”), it is not the plural of a community - it is not the “we” of the Burgundians, or people of native French stock, or citizens of the interwar period, or anything else. It is a “we” that is au courant about the pure and the impure, a “we” of transfusion of contagion, of feeling/felt: a paradoxical space of “chiasmus”, explains Merleau-Ponty, an interface of inside and outside, subject and object, a polytopy of decanting and communion beyond the fractures, the cruelty, the war between the sexes and the isolation of different species. It is a certain way of being outside oneself, of expressing a disseminated, disidentified, in-human self, a self au courant about the world’s flesh. It is a way of being in love, obviously, but in Colette’s pure and impure sense; she is au courant about every kind of love and fixes on none.

'Love Expesses Itself Only In Metaphors…'

Julia Kristeva, Colette (2004) 

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GIRLS

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Makers and Founders

Zeitgeist interviews. 

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Rietveld Schröder House, Utrecht

(Source: Wikipedia)

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My monday just got better: John Waters on Jonas Mekas! An early new year’s resolution? To make a trip to NYC to visit Anthology Film Archives in 2013. 

(Source: serpentinegallery.org)

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